Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Foundation

 
Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship
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Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Foundation
1600 Kapiolani Blvd Suite 204
Honolulu, HI 96814
Phone: (808) 524-4450
Fax: (808) 524-4451
E-mail: ehawkins@jashawaii.org

The Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship is awarded to 1) graduate students in Japan for study at the University of Hawaii at Manoa; and 2) an American graduate student at the University of Hawaii at Manoa for study in Japan who is pursuing a subject area leading to better understanding between Japan and the United States.

The Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Foundation (CPASF) was established in 1959 to commemorate the wedding of then Crown Prince Akihito and Crown Princess Michiko. The purpose of the CPASF is to promote understanding between the U.S. and Japan by offering scholarships for study in Hawaii and Japan. A grand total of 136 scholarships have been awarded since 1973. The Japan-America Society of Hawaii administers the scholarship.

For American students:

The scholarship covers one or two years of study in Japan and provides a $30,000 scholarship award in addition to a $15,000 annual allowance which covers tuition and one-time round-trip airfare from Honolulu to Japan. Any amount of this $15,000 allocation remaining after tuition and airfare reimbursements are made will be paid out to the recipient as a Cost of Living Allowance. The application for the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship is now available here.

All applicants must appear before a Screening Committee on November 21, 2014. Finalists must appear before the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Foundation Board of Trustees on December 18, 2014.

For Japanese students:

The CPASF Scholarship is for one or two years of study at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and provides a full-tuition scholarship from the University of Hawaii Foundation, $25,000 per year for living expenses, and up to $1,500 for one-time round-trip economy class airfare from Japan to Honolulu from the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Foundation.

For Japanese graduate students interested in applying for the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship, please contact Mr. Soji Samikawa, Senior Manager, Public Relations Bureau, Nippon Keidanren (Japanese Business Federation), 1-3-2 Otemachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8188. He may be reached by email at samikawa@keidanren.or.jp

Please click here for the Japanese Language Version.

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. :   Two Scholars Presented with the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Award


Two scholars were presented with the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship award at a formal ceremony at the Japanese Consulate on May 8th. New Chairman of the Scholarship Foundation, Mr. Allen Uyeda, presented the certificates to Japanese recipient Ms. Sakiko Yasuda and University of Hawaii student Mr. John Seymour. Foundation Trustees and members of UH Foundation and Center for Japanese Studies were invited to this event. Mr. Uyeda thanked Consul General Toyoei Shigeeda and Mrs. Michiko Shigeeda for opening their residence for this ceremony, and noted that the Scholarship was mentioned in a recent Joint Statement following President Obama's visit with Japanese Prime Minister Abe as among non-governmental programs linking the people of our two countries and being "indispensable" for building relationships. Consul General Shigeeda then welcomed all, echoing the importance of this Scholarship in promoting friendship and understanding between U.S. and Japan.

Ms. Yasuda received her B.S. in Nursing and Education from Kibi International University and her Master of Public Health from Kyoto University. She is a Ph.D. of Public Health Candidate at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, John A. Burns School of Medicine. Her research topic is school-based intervention to improve health for children.
Mr. Seymour received a Bachelor of Music in Composition and Theory from the Blair School of Music at Vanderbilt University and a Master of Arts in Music Composition from the University of North Texas. He is currently a Ph.D Candidate at the University of Hawaii at Manoa where he composes new music for traditional Asian instruments and also researches Gagaku, an ancient genre of Japanese music which he will study in Japan.

Akihito Scholarship Awardees Sakiko Yasuda and John Seymour with Consul General and Mrs. Shigeeda, Trustees, Scholarship Staff, and supporters.


The Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship was established in 1959 to commemorate the wedding of Crown Prince Akihito and Princess Michiko. The purpose of the scholarship is to promote better understanding between the peoples of Japan and the United States by providing scholarships to UH scholars to study in Japan and Japanese scholars to study at UH. The Emperor and Empress of Japan honors the scholars with a personal audience at their residence in the Imperial Palace. Since inception, a total of 142 scholarships have been granted. Each grant is approximately $45,000 per year and can be awarded for two years. Those interested in this scholarship are directed to the Japan-America Society of Hawaii website at www.jashawaii.org under "CPASF."

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. : UH Student John Seymour Selected as Akihito Scholar


John Seymour, Doctoral Candidate and Lecturer, Music Theory and Composition at the University of Hawaii at Manoa Music Department, has been selected as Akihito Scholar for 2014 and 2015 academic years. Mr. Seymour was selected from several candidates after undergoing a review of application and an interview. Mr. Seymour impressed the selection committee with his background and proposed field of study, Music Composition with focus on the court music of Gagaku. He intends to study at the Sengoku Gakuen College of Music in Tokyo. The scholarship provides $45,000 per year, which covers tuition, living expenses, and allowance for one time round trip economy class airfare between Hawaii and Japan.

The Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Foundation provides scholarships to UH graduate students for study in Japan and graduate students in Japan for study at UH. The Scholarship was established to commemorate the wedding of Crown Prince Akihito to Michiko Shoda in 1959 to promote good relations between U.S. and Japan. After completing their studies, the scholars are expected to serve around the world as “ambassadors of good will.”

A unique aspect of the scholarship is that scholars are given an audience with Their Majesties The Emperor and Empress of Japan at their Imperial Palace residence in Tokyo. Their Majesties have maintained a special relationship with the scholars, evidenced by their visit to Hawaii in July 2009 to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Scholarship during which they met with the scholar alumni. The scholarship is administered by the Japan-America Society of Hawaii (JASH). Those interested in the scholarship are directed to the website at www.jashawaii.org/cpas.asp

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Crown Prince Akihito Scholars Ms. Michelle Daigle of the University of Hawaii Department of Anthropology and Ms. Ikuyo Takara of the University of Tokyo Graduate School of Arts and Sciences meet with Their Majesties The Emperor and Empress of Japan at their residence in the Imperial Palace grounds. Each year, new Akihito Scholars are accorded an audience with the Emperor and Empress. Accompanying the scholars are Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Foundation Trustee Joichi Saito and Nippon Keidanren Director General Yoshio Nakamura (L-R: Ms. Daigle, Ms. Takara, Mr. Saito, Mr. Nakamura, Their Majesties)

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Central Pacific Bank President and CEO John Dean (L) presents a check for $50,000 to Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Foundation Chairman Howard Hamamoto (C-L) to assist its fundraising. Accompanying Mr. Dean and Mr. Hamamoto are CPB Executive Vice President Lance Mizumoto (C-R) and CPASF President Ed Hawkins (R)

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. : UH Scholars Receive the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship


On May 13th at the Japanese Consulate, two University of Hawaii students were presented with the prestigious Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship. Chairman of the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Foundation, Mr. Howard Hamamoto, presented certificates of scholarship to two scholars, Ms. Ikuyo Takara and Ms. Laura Specker Sullivan. Ms. Malia Peters of UH Foundation also presented scholarship certificates.

Ms. Takara holds a B.A. from Japan Women's University and M.A. from the University of Tokyo where she is currently a PhD candidate. She is pursuing her second M.A. at UH Manoa in Second Language Studies. Ms. Sullivan received her B.A. in Philosophy from Williams College and her M.A. in Philosophy from UH Manoa. She is pursuing a Ph.D. in Philosophy and a Graduate Certificate in Japanese Studies at UH Manoa. Ms. Sullivan will be researching ethics of medical decision-making at the University of Kyoto.

Akihito Scholars (Ms. Takara, center left; Ms. Sullivan, center right) sitting with Consul General and Mrs. Shigeeda, surrounded by Foundation Trustees and supporters. Chairman Hamamoto who presented the awards is standing rear middle.

The Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship was established in 1959 to commemorate the wedding of Crown Prince Akihito and Princess Michiko. The purpose of the scholarship is to promote better understanding between the peoples of Japan and the United States by providing scholarships to UH scholars to study in Japan and Japanese scholars to study at UH. The Emperor and Empress of Japan honors the scholars with a personal audience at their residence in the Imperial Palace. Since inception, a total of 140 scholarships have been granted.

American scholars are provided with either one or two years of study in Japan and $30,000 in annual living expenses, plus up to $15,000 annual allowance for tuition and round trip airfare to Japan. Japanese scholars are provided with full tuition at the University of Hawaii plus $20,000 in annual living expenses and a round trip airfare to Hawaii. Those interested in applying for this scholarship are directed to the Japan-America Society of Hawaii website at www.jashawaii.org under “CPASF.”

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. : U.S. and Japanese Scholars Receive the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship


Two scholars, one from Japan and one from the University of Hawaii were presented with the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship at the Japanese Consulate on June 26, 2012. This year again Consul General Yoshihiko Kamo and Mrs. Etsuko Kamo opened their residence for this ceremony.

The Japanese scholar is Ms. Yukie Michelle Lloyd (academic years 2011-2013). Ms. Lloyd received her B.S. in Biochemistry from Kitasato University and a Master’s degree from the University of Tokyo. She has always been interested in vaccine research, and currently she is pursuing her Ph.D. in Tropical Medicine at the University of Hawaii at Manoa’s John A. Burns School of Medicine, exploring a new Dengue vaccine candidate.

The U.S. scholar is Mr. Christopher Smith (academic years 2012-2014). Mr. Smith received his BA in East Asian Studies form the College of William and Mary and his M.A. in the same field from the University of Virginia. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Japanese literature at the University of Hawaii in Manoa. His research interest is in historical Japanese anachronism in Edo period and contemporary literature. Mr. Smith will be studying in Japan beginning this year.

(Front, L-R) Scholarship recipients Ms. Yukie Michelle Lloyd, Mr. Christopher Smith; (Rear, L-R) UH CJS’s Dr. Robert Huey, Trustee Christine Yano, Trustee Jean Rolles, Trustee Siegfried Ramler, Mrs. Kamo, Consul General Kamo, Trustee Sharon Weiner, Trustee Stafford Kiguchi, UHF’s Malia Peters, CPASF President Ed Hawkins..

The Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship was established in 1959 to commemorate the wedding of Crown Prince Akihito and Princess Michiko. The purpose of the scholarship is to promote better understanding between the peoples of Japan and the United States by providing scholarships to UH scholars to study in Japan and Japanese scholars to study at UH. The Emperor and Empress of Japan honors the scholars with a personal audience at their residence in the Imperial Palace. Since inception, a total of 138 scholarships have been granted.

American scholars are provided with either one or two years of study in Japan and $30,000 in annual living expenses, plus up to $15,000 annual allowance for tuition and round trip airfare to Japan. Japanese scholars are provided with full tuition at the University of Hawaii plus $20,000 in annual living expenses and a round trip airfare to Hawaii. Those interested in applying for this scholarship are directed to the Japan-America Society of Hawaii website at www.jashawaii.org/cpas.asp.



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. : CPASF Scholar Brings Cheer to Japan Disaster Evacuees


Pamela Mitchell, a PhD candidate conducting research in Nagano, Japan and a former Crown-Prince Akihito Scholar, was in Tokyo when the great earthquake and tsunami struck northeast Japan on March 11, 2011. Pamela rushed home to the U.S. to assure her family and friends she was safe, but set her sights on returning quickly to Nagano not just to continue her research but to do something to assist the victims of the great tragedy. When Pamela returned to Nagano, she learned that the prefecture and city had offered refuge to families from the disaster areas. Pamela wanted desperately to do something to help these refugees, especially the children, and hit upon the idea of making and presenting mini-quilts as signs of beauty and comfort. Pamela began this project with her Japanese scholar friend Nao Nomura who she met during her studies at the University of Tokyo. They obtained the support of quilting guilds in both the mainland and in Hawaii. So far, quilting guilds in South Dakota, Nebraska, and Hawaii have sent boxes of quilts, 49 quilts from Hawaii alone (former Akihito Scholar and UH CJS's Dr. Gay Satsuma is a contributor). Pamela's goal is to provide quilts to all the 400 displaced families living in Nagano Prefecture. Read more of Pamela's "Project Friendship" and how you could assist.

Click to read more.

Clockwise from top left: Quilts sent by quilting guilds unwrapped and ready to be presented; Pamela with two refugee children, one holding a quilt and the other a drawing; Nagano City Hall official accepting quilts to be distributed to families; satisfied girl with a quilt she selected.


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. : Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Foundation Awards Scholarships To U.S. and Japanese Scholars


On June 15, 2011, Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Foundation (CPASF) Trustees and supporters gathered at the Japanese Consulate in Honolulu to witness the presentation of Crown Prince Akihito Scholarships to a U.S. and a Japanese scholar. Japan's Consul General Yoshihiko Kamo and Mrs. Etsuko Kamo again provided a stately setting for this ceremony at their official residence. On hand were University of Hawaii Foundation President Ms. Donna Vuchinich and Director of Scholarship Development Ms. Malia Peters. The UH Foundation provides tuition waiver and other scholarship support to Japanese Akihito Scholars. Also on hand was Dr. Robert Huey, Director of the UH Manoa Center for Japanese Studies who helps recruit scholarship candidates each year. Foundation Vice Chairs Siegfried Ramler and Allen Uyeda shared emcee duties. Afterwards, scholars, Trustees, and other invited guests were treated to refreshments provided by the Consulate.

The two scholars for this year are: Ms. Madoka Nagado (2010-2012 recipient), who is pursuing a PhD in English at the University of Hawaii, Manoa, focusing on the literature of Henry James. Ms. Michelle Daigle (2011-2013 recipient), a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at UH Manoa who will be attached to Kumamoto University in Kyushu, Japan, researching the ramifications of industrial pollution on the environment and public health by examining Minamata Disease.

(Front, L-R) Mrs. Etsuko Kamo, scholarship recipients Michelle Daigle and Madoka Nagado, Consul General Yoshihiko Kamo. (Rear, L-R) UHF's Malia Peters, Trustee Christine Yano, UH/CJS's Robert Huey, Trustee Joichi Saito, Trustee Barbara Tanabe, CPASF Vice Chair Allen Uyeda, Trustee Jean Rolles, CPASF Vice Chair Siegfried Ramler, Trustee Glenn Miyataki, UHF's Donna Vuchinich, CPASF President Ed Hawkins.


The Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship was established in 1959 to commemorate the wedding of then Crown Prince Akihito and Princess Michiko. The purpose of the scholarship is to promote better understanding between the peoples of Japan and the United States by providing scholarships to UH scholars to study in Japan and Japanese scholars to study at UH. The Emperor and Empress of Japan honors the scholars with a personal audience at their residence in the Imperial Palace. Since inception, a total of 136 scholarships have been granted.

American scholars are provided with either one or two years of study in Japan and $30,000 in annual living expenses, plus up to $15,000 annual allowance for tuition and round trip airfare to Japan. Japanese scholars are provided with full tuition at the University of Hawaii plus $25,000 in annual living expenses and a round trip airfare to Hawaii.

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. : Crown Prince Akihito Scholars meet with The Emperor and Empress


Four recipients of the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarships met with Their Majesties The Emperor and Empress of Japan on June 28th at their Tokyo Imperial Palace residence. As part of the scholarship, awardees are honored with a personal audience with The Emperor and Empress.

Since inception, 139 scholars have been selected for this prestigious scholarship that awards either one or two years of study in Japan to a University of Hawaii student, and to a Japanese student to study at the University of Hawaii. Since 2008, the scholarship has also included scholarships for Japanese students to study at the University of Hawaii's Shidler College of Business leading to a Masters in Financial Engineering degree.

Akihito Scholars meet with Their Majesties (from left, Scholars Michael Dziesinski, John Oglevee, Pamela Runestad, Madoka Nagado; CPASF Trustee Mr. Mark Fukunaga; Nippon Keidanren Director General Mr. Yoshio Nakamura; Their Majesties)


The Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship was established in 1959 to commemorate the wedding of Crown Prince Akihito and Princess Michiko. The purpose of the scholarship is to promote better understanding between the peoples of Japan and the United States by providing scholarships to UH scholars to study in Japan and Japanese scholars to study at UH. Those interested in applying for this scholarship are directed to the Japan-America Society of Hawaii (JASH) website at www.jashawaii.org under "CPASF" or call the JASH office at 524-4450.

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. : Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Foundation Awards Scholarships to Five Recipients


Recipients of the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Foundation (CPASF) scholarships gathered on May 14, 2010 at the Japanese Consulate in Honolulu to accept their awards from the Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Mr. Howard Hamamoto. Consul General Yoshihiko Kamo and Mrs. Etsuko Kamo hosted the event at their consulate residence. In attendance were Foundation Trustees, and University of Hawaii Foundation guests Ms. Malia Peters and Ms. Donna Vuchinich. Afterwards, scholars, Trustees, and other invited guests were treated to refreshments provided by the Consulate.

Five scholars were given certificates this year: Ms. Natsuko Higa (2008-2010 recipient), with B.A. and M.A. degrees in Cultural Anthropology from Kyoto University, is researching Village Economics in the Kingdom of Tonga and is pursuing a PhD with the Department of Anthropology at the University of Hawaii (UH) at Manoa. Ms. Hiromi Yoshida (2008-2010 recipient), with B.A. in Literature and M.A. in Human Sciences from Waseda University in Tokyo, is pursuing her M.A. in Second Language Studies focusing on Sociolinguistics at UH Manoa while a candidate for PhD at Waseda. Ms. Satona Murakami (2009-2011 recipient), with M.D. from Shinshu University and PhD in Medical Science from Nagoya City University, is pursuing her M.A. in Clinical Research at the UH John A Burns School of Medicine. Mr. Yohei Sekiguchi (2009-2011 recipient), with B.A. and M.A. degrees in English from the University of Tokyo, is pursing a PhD in American Studies focusing on the cultural and historic aspects of the Vietnam War Literature at UH Manoa. Ms. Sharon Fukayama (2010-2011 recipient), with B.A. in Environmental Information from Keio University and M.A. in Education from Chaminade University, is pursuing a PhD in Education with a specialization in Curriculum Studies focusing on Japanese, English dual language education at UH Manoa, College of Education and will be conducting research in Japan.

Scholarship award recipients (Front, L-R) Natsuko Higa, Hiromi Yoshida, Satona Murakami, Yohei Sekiguchi, Sharon Fukayama; (Back, L-R) Mrs. Kamo, Consul General Kamo, Howard Hamamoto, CPASF President Ed Hawkins.

The Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship was established in 1959 to commemorate the wedding of then Crown Prince Akihito and Princess Michiko. The purpose of the scholarship is to promote better understanding between the peoples of Japan and the United States by providing scholarships to UH scholars to study in Japan and Japanese scholars to study at UH. The Emperor and Empress of Japan honors the scholars with a personal audience at their residence in the Imperial Palace. A total of 132 scholarships have been granted.

American scholars are provided with either one or two years of study in Japan and $30,000 in annual living expenses, plus up to $15,000 annual allowance for tuition and round trip airfare to Japan. Those interested in applying for this scholarship are directed to the Japan-America Society of Hawaii website's CPASF pages or call the JASH office at 524-4450.

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. : Sharon Fukayama Selected as Akihito Scholar for 2010


University of Hawaii PhD candidate Sharon Fukayama has been awarded the prestigious Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship for academic year 2010. Ms. Fukayama was selected from a pool of 10 outstanding applicants. The scholarship provides $45,000 per year, which includes up to $15,000 allowance for tuition and one time round trip economy class airfare between Hawaii and Japan. Ms. Fukayama, majoring in Education, will be studying at Tokyo's Keio University's Graduate School of Human Relations collecting data on Japan's educational system and teaching methods as her goal is establish a bilingual, bicultural school in Hawaii.


The CPASF annually provides scholarships to University of Hawaii graduate students for study in Japan, and graduate students in Japan for study at the University of Hawaii. The Scholarship was established to commemorate the wedding of Crown Prince Akihito to Michiko Shoda in 1959 to promote good relations between U.S. and Japan, and so far has provided scholarships to 132 scholars who are now serving around the world as "ambassadors of good will." A unique aspect of the scholarship is that the scholars are given an audience with Their Majesties The Emperor and Empress of Japan at their Imperial Palace residence in Tokyo. Their Majesties have maintained a special relationship with the scholars, evidenced by their visit to Hawaii in July, 2009 to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Scholarship during which they met with the scholar alumni who attended.

The scholarship is administered by the Japan-America Society of Hawaii (JASH), and those interested in the scholarship are directed to the JASH website under "CPASF."

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. : Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship Celebrates 50th Anniversary Banquet And Hosts Their Majesties The Emperor and Empress of Japan


The year 2009 is a very special anniversary for the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship and the Scholarship Foundation. It has been 50 years since the creation of the Scholarship named in honor of the current Emperor of Japan, Akihito. It was in 1959 that then Crown Prince Akihito wed Michiko Shoda and the community leaders of Hawaii searched for a way to honor this marriage with a gift from the people of Hawaii. Instead of a usual marriage gift, the leaders led by the late Ralph Honda suggested a scholarship named in honor of the Crown Prince, with the thought that a scholarship would be a lasting gift that would benefit scholars from both Japan and America and continue to enhance relations between the two countries. An endowment was created with initial contribution from the Crown Prince himself, and since then 129 scholars from Japan and the United States have become Akihito scholars. As a unique aspect of the scholarship, the scholars are given a personal audience with the Emperor and Empress at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo. It is through this connection that the bonds between the Emperor and Empress and the scholars, and with the Scholarship and the Foundation, have remained alive and strong. It is for this very reason that Their Majesties attended the 50th Anniversary of the Scholarship here in Honolulu.

Planning for this 50th Anniversary began years ago during the tenure of Ralph Honda as Chairman of the Foundation. Ralph passed away in 2004 but his vision was taken on by the new Chairman, Howard Hamamoto. Through those years, Ralph Honda, followed by Howard Hamamoto, engaged with the Japanese Government and the Imperial Household Agency that handles the affairs of the Royal Family to invite the Emperor and Empress to Hawaii for the 50th Anniversary Celebration. An opportunity was provided when the Japanese Government planned a state visit of Their Majesties to Canada in 2009, informing the Foundation that a stop in Hawaii to attend the Scholarship's Anniversary Celebration would be possible. With this decision by the Japanese Government, the stage was set to welcome the Royal Couple to Hawaii and to include them in the Scholarship's 50th Anniversary Celebration. The Royal Couple arrived in Honolulu on July 14, 2009 following their state visit to Canada. They engaged in various activities involving the community during their visit, highlighted by attending the 50th Anniversary Banquet of the Scholarship on the evening of July 15 at the Hilton Hawaiian Village Coral Ballroom.

Although the theme of the banquet was to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship, it was truly a community affair with attendance by over 1,600 guests representing major Japanese-American and community organizations to include the Japan-America Society of Hawaii, Honolulu Japanese Chamber of Commerce, Honolulu Japanese Junior Chamber of Commerce, Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii, Japanese Women's Society Foundation, Nippon Club, United Japanese Society of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, and the University of Hawaii Foundation.

Emperor and Empress arrive at the Anniversary Banquet, greeted by CPASF Chairman Howard Hamamoto and Nobuko Zecha; Nainoa Thompson presents a replica model of the voyaging canoe Hokulea as Their Majesties rise to view it.

In keeping with the theme of the banquet, special awards were presented to two Scholars, one Japanese (Dr. Ritsuko Kikusawa) and one American (Dr. Carl Becker), named in honor of the late Ralph Honda for their outstanding scholarship and commitment to the mission of the scholarship—to enhance U.S.-Japan relations. Another scholar, Dr. Sharon Minichiello, former Director of University of Hawaii's Center for Japanese Studies, was recognized with a Distinguished Service Award for her outstanding service to all the scholarship alumni as well as her work with the Foundation. American Scholars received their awards from Japanese Ambassador to the United States Ichiro Fujisaki and the Japanese Scholar received her award from Charge d'Affaires of the U.S. Embassy in Japan James Zumwalt as both the Emperor and Empress watched.

Remembering also that this visit to Hawaii is a celebration of the Royal Couple's 50th Wedding Anniversary, two special gifts were presented to Their Majesties on this occasion. The first was a Milo bowl (Milo is wood reserved for Royalty) designed in the shape of the Royal Chrysanthemum by spouse of Foundation Trustee Mrs. Nobuko Nagura Zecha and carved by master carver Scott Hare. The second was a model of the Hokulea voyaging canoe (the Hokulea made a voyage to Japan last year as a gesture of friendship and ties between Hawaii and Japan) made by artist Kaili Chun and presented by Master Navigator Nainoa Thompson of the Polynesian Voyaging Society. In keeping with the Hawaiian theme, the evening's performance featured a keiki hula performed by Hula Halau Olana, singing of the Hawaiian Wedding Song by Nalani Olds, as well as a royal processional and recessional led by the Royal Order of Kamehameha I carrying the royal kahili standards and blowing of a unique conch shell melody by Richard Bell.

The evening concluded with a kampai and congratulatory toast from the Emperor himself, "for the future of the scholarship students, for the continued development of this scholarship to meet the expectations of future students, and for the further strengthening of the friendly relations between Hawaii and Japan." Following the banquet, the Emperor and Empress held a special reception in an adjoining room for the scholars and their spouses.

His Majesty The Emperor of Japan offers a congratulatory toast on occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the Crown Prince Akihito Scholarship, at the head table from left are Yoshio Nakamura (Director General of the Nippon Keidanren, Japan Committee of the CPASF), Mrs. Yoriko Fujisaki, Charge d'Affaires James Zumwalt (U.S. Embassy, Japan), Mrs. Joanne Hamamoto, Howard Hamamoto (Chairman, CPASF), Emperor Akihito, Empress Michiko, Governor Linda Lingle (State of Hawaii), Yasuo Fukuda (former Prime Minister of Japan and head of the Japanese Delegation), Ichiro Fujisaki (Japanese Ambassador to the United States), Ms. Ann Kambara (spouse of Charge Zumwalt), Toshio Kunikata (Consul General of Japan at Honolulu), Dr. Ritsuko Kikusawa (Akihito Scholar and recipient of the Ralph Honda Award for Outstanding Scholarship)

Click here to download the full script of the toast given by His Majesty The Emperor of Japan.

 
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